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  1. Lesson
  2. Class 01- Introduction
    7 Topics
  3. Class 02 - Competitor Research
    8 Topics
  4. Class 03 - Customer Research
    7 Topics
  5. Class 04 - Stakeholder Research
    8 Topics
  6. Class 05 - Scoping Your Opportunity
    8 Topics
  7. Class 06 - Product/Service Ideation
    6 Topics
  8. Class 07 - Customer Journey Design
    6 Topics
  9. Class 08 - Prototype Planning
    8 Topics
  10. Class 09 - Marketing
    7 Topics
  11. Class 10 - Revenue Streams & Pricing
    8 Topics
  12. Class 11 - Branding
    9 Topics
  13. Class 12 - Bookkeeping
    9 Topics
  14. Class 13 - Goal & Roadmap
    7 Topics
  15. Class 14 - Cash Flow Forecasting
    9 Topics
  16. Class 15 - Capital Need & Sources
    7 Topics
  17. Class 16 - Company Registration
    7 Topics
  18. Class 17 - Pitching Your Business
    7 Topics
  19. Class 18 - Design Promo Event & Booth
    6 Topics
  20. Class 19 - Finalising Your Business Plan
    7 Topics
  21. Class 20 - Celebration Event
    5 Topics
Lesson 9, Topic 5
In Progress

Prototyping test planning

Muhammad 07/12/2022
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What is a prototype?

A prototype is a simple model of your solution that you use to test your ideas quickly and
cheaply. This helps you to make improvements or possible changes in direction. Prototyping
is about bringing your ideas to life and learning what works before fully starting your
business.


Prototypes can take many forms, but they are all tangible forms of your ideas. You have
actually already made some quick prototypes by drawing your idea and making a customer
journey
. And now we will take it one step further and make simple prototypes designed to
test your assumptions.
1. 
Idea: In class 6, you came up with many ideas. When you write down your idea,
rest of the process.
2.
Idea Drawing: In class 6, you have made a drawing of your idea. A drawing helps
to make your idea more detailed and easier to share with others. You used the
drawing to learn if others are interested in your idea.
3.
Customer Journey: In class 7, you made a customer journey for your idea. This
helps you to turn your idea into a story, written from the perspective of your
customer. A customer journey explains how you expect your business idea to
work. But it is still based on many assumptions. You used the customer journey to
get feedback from potential customers.
4.
Simple Prototype: This week you will start making simple prototypes. A simple
prototype is something that you can make quickly to help you test the behaviour
of your customers. You make simple prototypes to make a part of your business
feel real to the customers. This helps you to test your riskiest assumptions.

Prototype testing

In the next weeks you will work on making simple prototypes to test your riskiest
assumptions.

We will give you a few examples of a risky assumption, and what kind of simple prototype
you can make to test.

Business Idea: Smoked home-grown chicken

Riskiest assumption:
People are interested in smoked chicken as an alternative to normal chicken.

Simple prototype:
Cook a meal with normal and one with smoked chicken. Instead of smoking your own chicken, make it easier by buying an smoked chicken from a restaurant.

Test:
Set up a small stand in your neighbourhood (just for testing) and sell two menu options: one with normal chicken and one with smoked chicken for a bit higher price. See what people prefer!

Test is successful when:
At least 40% of the clients chooses the smoked chicken dish.

Business Idea: Smoked home-grown chicken

Riskiest assumption:
People are interested in smoked chicken as an alternative to normal chicken.

Simple prototype:
Cook a meal with normal and one with smoked chicken. Instead of smoking your own chicken, make it easier by buying an smoked chicken from a restaurant.

Test:
Set up a small stand in your neighbourhood (just for testing) and sell two menu options: one with normal chicken and one with smoked chicken for a bit higher price. See what people prefer!

Test is successful when:
At least 40% of the clients chooses the smoked chicken dish.

Business idea: Selling farm produce online

Riskiest assumption:
Will people will trust to buy their products online.

Simple prototype:
Make a paper example how the website/app will look like on the phone of the customer.

Test:
Ask someone to try to make an order using the paper example. Ask them to rate how much they would trust this way of buying on a scale of 1-5.

Test is successful when:
The average rating is at least 3.

Business idea: Subscription on clean water

Riskiest assumption:
People are willing to purchase a weekly subscription for home delivered clean water.

Simple prototype:
Set up a simple but quality looking shop in the street including water to attract customers.

Test:
Engage people going by in the street and inform them on the subscription for clean water. Ask people who are interested to leave their contact details for when the service becomes available.

Test is successful when:
At least 15 people sign up in a day.

Group discussion

Discuss the following statements with the whole group. Ask everyone to share what they
think.

Why would you prototype and test your business ideas?

Can you think of more examples of prototype testing?

Workbook exercise 8.4: Prototype test planning

Time to prepare your own plans for prototyping! 

Time: 30 min

Workbook needed!

What to do:

1. 
Work together with your buddy, discuss together which assumption(s) you want
to test (first) and how you can build and test your prototype. Start with one
person first, and then switch.
2.
Business Idea: Write in one sentence what business idea you are working on.
3.
Riskiest assumption: Look at the riskiest assumptions you wrote down in the
previous exercise. Which ones do you want to test first?
4.
Simple prototype: What part of your business idea do you need to make real?
Can you keep it as simple as possible? It does not have to be a fully functioning
product or service, just enough to give people an idea of your business idea.
5.
Test: How will you test your riskiest assumption? Where will you test? For how
long? Look again at the examples. What will you ask the customers?
6.
Test is successful when: What should the outcome be of your test to prove that
your assumption is true? For example, if you want to know if people like your
coffee, you can ask people to rate the taste of different coffees on a scale from
1-5 (5 being the best tasting). And maybe you want your coffee to rate at least a 4.
7.
Resources: What do you need to make a prototype of your business idea? What
materials do you have yourself? Can you borrow something? What do you need
to buy? If your costs are too high, you can also make your prototype more simple
to keep your costs low.
8.
Budget: How much money do you need to build your prototype? Have you saved
enough? How else will you be able to secure your budget?

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